Published: 1st JANUARY 2024

Wheeling and accessibility on London's National Cycle Network

London has many great places to wheel and there are lots of National Cycle Network routes in the capital that are traffic-free and suitable for family and all-ability adventures - whether you are walking, wheeling or cycling. Here are some of the best places to explore and where you can find inclusive cycling sessions across the city.

A group of people smiling and waving as they cycle by on adapted cycles through a park.

Feel the wind in your hair and meet new people at an inclusive cycling session like this one run by Bikeworks in Victoria Park.

What's on this page 



Where to wheel on the National Cycle Network in London  

There are some great places on the National Cycle Network to explore when wheeling in London. 

Waterlink way: Greenwich to Kent House and New Addington (Route 21) 

The three-mile section between Ladywell Fields and Lower Sydenham follows the river Pool along a flat traffic-free green corridor of linear parks.   

 

London Docklands and Lea Valley (Route 1)

The Lea Valley between Stratford and Tottenham, and the Lea Valley regional park between Waltham Cross and Broxbourne offer miles of green spaces. 

And each one is linked by Route 1 and other local paths so you can explore these areas in your own way. 

 

The Ingreborne Valley Way (Route 136) between Rainham and Upminster

Between Rainham and Upminster you'll find three miles of off-road, undulating paths linking IngreborneHill, Hornchurch Country Park and Hacton Park. 

 

Thames Path: Greenwich to Dartford (Route 1)

You can follow the Thames for 12 miles between Greenwich and Erith on flat, traffic-free paths

 

Wandle trail: Wandsworth to Carshalton and Farthing Downs (Route 20)

The five-mile section between Earlsfield and Poulter park follows the river Wandle along traffic-free paths and some quiet streets. 

 

Waterlink way: Greenwich to Kent House and New Addington (Route 21)

The three-mile section between Ladywell Fields and Lower Sydenham follows the river Pool along a flat traffic-free green corridor of linear parks.  

  

Isabelle, south London

I had a wonderful 20km hand bike ride through South London on the National Cycle Network's Wandle Trail, to Merton Abbey Mills, on to Beddington and back.

I was nervous about path accessibility on these routes but was actually happily surprised!

Great parks for wheeling 

There are many parks and open green spaces across the city where you can walk and wheel.
  

Battersea Park

This is a flat traffic-free circuit with wide pathways making it suitable for larger adapted bikes, wheelchairs, mobility scooters and pushchairs.

Brockwell Park

It's an undulating traffic-free circuit so you can start and end at the same point.

Burgess Park

This park is a flat, wide traffic-free path through a beautiful park. And it links up with Route 425 on the National Cycle Network.

Bushy Park

This route has up to four miles of flat and mostly traffic-free paths. And it links up with Route 4 on the National Cycle Network.

Dulwich Park

It's a wide and flat traffic-free circuit so you can loop around the park.

Finsbury Park

This park provides a wide, undulating traffic-free loop with a few more challenging hills.

Gunpowder Park

It's made up of traffic-free paths with a gentle hill, and it links up with Route 1 on the National Cycle Network.

Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens

These areas both have a number of wide paths with some gentle hills where cycling is permitted.

Newham Greenway

This green space is an elevated, wide and flat 4-mile long traffic-free link between the Olympic Park and Beckton.

It includes some controlled or quiet road crossings.

And it links to Route 1 and Route 13 on the National Cycle Network.

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

This is a network of wide, traffic-free paths that you can explore. And it links up with Route 1 on the National Cycle Network.

Richmond Park

The stunning Tamsin Trail is an undulating seven-mile off-road gravel path.

You can combine this route with Route 4 on the National Cycle Network to give you different options and to allow you to plan a longer or shorter adventure.

Victoria Park

This is a wide and flat traffic-free loop that links up with Route 1 on the National Cycle Network. 

A person in a motorised wheelchair smiling as they wheel through a park.

Inclusive cycling sessions for disabled people

There are lots of sessions taking place around London to support disabled people to cycle.

Some of these sessions also offer you a chance to try out a range of adapted cycles.  

Wheels for Wellbeing runs inclusive cycling sessions for disabled people in South London at:

  • Croydon Arena
  • Herne Hill Velodrome
  • Ladywell Day Centre.

They have a fleet of different types of adapted cycles that you can try with the help of qualified instructors.  

Bikeworks all-ability cycling clubs are for people with learning, physical and sensory disabilities.

They take place in:

  • Victoria Park
  • the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park
  • Central park, East Ham
  • Little Wormwood Scrubs
  • Leyton Jubilee park
  • Higham Hill park
  • Bush Hill park.

They have a range of different adapted cycles and qualified instructors to support you.  

Companion cycling is a community resource offering hire of different types of adapted cycles for people with disabilities and special needs in Bushy Park.

Cycling for all helps people enjoy cycling. Their website has a searchable index of inclusive cycling sessions across London.

 

Ready to get started on the National Cycle Network in London? Find a route near you. 

  

Find out more about the National Cycle Network in London.

Share this page

Explore our latest route collections for the National Cycle Network in London