Route 754 is an entirely traffic-free cycle path from Edinburgh to Glasgow. At times it runs along the towpath of the Union Canal, a wonderful wildlife corridor and recreational space. Along the route, you’ll pass interesting sights on the canal such as the Falkirk Wheel, a rotating boat lift.

The entirely traffic-free Route 754 runs across central Scotland from Edinburgh to Glasgow, Scotland’s two biggest cities, along peaceful canalside paths.

Steeped in history, Edinburgh is a delight to visit. From the medieval turrets and spires of the Old Town to the elegant Georgian New Town it’s a great place to spend some time. Edinburgh combines a rich cultural heritage with stunning new developments. There are lots of interesting museums and galleries to visit including the National Museum of Scotland and the Writers Museum.

At the other end of the route make sure you leave time to visit Glasgow. Once a prosperous shipbuilding city Glasgow is now famed for its great museums, thriving music scene, and fantastic Victorian and art nouveau architecture. It’s home to the Scottish Opera, Scottish Ballet and the National Theatre of Scotland.

Route 754 starts in Fountainbridge, near the centre of Edinburgh. Next, you’ll cycle along the wonderfully calm towpath of the Union Canal, through the towns of Broxburn, Linlithgow and Falkirk.

Route 754 links with the Forth & Clyde Canal at the Falkirk Wheel, a rotating boat lift that was built in 2000. The wheel replaces the original flight of locks that linked the two canals but were removed when the canal fell into disuse.

The canals are now enjoying a revival and provide a wonderful wildlife corridor and recreational space. While you’re beside the canals you have the possibility of spotting swans, kingfishers, otters, herons and other animals. Make sure you take the time on your trip to enjoy your surroundings and look out for these fantastic creatures.

From the Falkirk Wheel, Route 754 continues along the canal towpath through Kirkintilloch, the northern suburbs of Glasgow and the town of Clydebank, ending at the Bowling Basin, where the canal joins the River Clyde.

Clydebank was once one of the world’s major shipbuilding centres. If you’re interested in the town’s past you can learn all about the local, social and industrial history of the region at the Clydebank Museum.

This 56-mile route is entirely traffic-free and runs alongside gorgeous canals between two of Scotland’s most exciting and dynamic cities.

To make sure everyone gets the most out of their time by the water, please ensure you follow the Towpath Code.

Please note

We have taken all responsible steps to ensure that these routes are safe and achievable by people with a reasonable level of fitness. However, all outdoor activities involve a degree of risk. To the extent permitted by law, Sustrans accepts no responsibility for any accidents or injury resulting from following these routes. Walking and cycling routes change over time. Weather conditions may also affect path surfaces. Please use your own judgement when using the routes based upon the weather and the ability, experience and confidence levels of those in your group.

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