National Cycle Network routes in Glasgow and the surrounding area

Connecting Scotland's largest city and the surrounding areas of North Lanarkshire, South Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, Inverclyde, East Dunbartonshire and West Dunbartonshire, National Cycle Network routes in Glasgow and the surrounding area are vital everyday links and a great opportunity for families to escape the urban bustle.

National Route 7

Approaching Glasgow from the south, National Cycle Network Route 7 connects Lochwinnoch, Johnstone and Paisley in Renfrewshire to Scotland's largest city.

You'll travel along the mainly traffic-free Lochwinnoch Loop Line railway path and the ​Paisley & Clyde Railway Path. 

North of the River Clyde, National Cycle Network Route 7 is a scenic, mostly traffic-free link between Glasgow's West End and Balloch in Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park.

And it forms the southern section of the long-distance Lochs and Glens Way route.

Find more information about the Lochs and Glens Way with our interactive journey planner, created in partnership with VisitScotland.

National Route 74

Meandering through the open countryside of South Lanarkshire, National Cycle Network Route 74 is often used by those completing the LEJOG/JOGLE coast-to-coast challenge.

The route uses a mixture of on-road sections and traffic-free path, connecting to Strathclyde Country Park and National Cycle Network Route 75 north of Hamilton and the village of Abington to the south.

The small, well-kept picnic area close to the mining village of Coalbridge is a great stopping point.

Please note: there is a short gap in National Cycle Network Route 74 east of Douglas. 
 

National Route 75

Cutting a flat path across the length of Scotland's Central Belt, National Cycle Route 75 runs through the heart of Glasgow.

It links Gourock and Greenock in Iverclyde to Coatbridge and Caldercruix in North Lanarkshire.

Explore Glasgow's architecture and thriving cultural scene, or take a family-friendly journey on the tranquil, traffic-free paths of National Cycle Network Route 75 to the east and west of the city.

Catch a ferry connection at Dunoon to continue your journey westwards across the Cowal Peninsula using the Dunoon to Portavadie named route, or head eastwards to reach the traffic-free Airdrie to Bathgate railway path.

National Route 753 (north)

National Cycle Network Route 753 (north) is a mostly traffic-free coastal path between Inverkip and McInroy's Point in Gourock, where the route connects to National Cycle Network Route 75. 

National Route 754

Running entirely along the traffic-free towpath alongside the Forth & Clyde Canal, Route 754 links Bowling and Glasgow to East Dunbartonshire and Falkirk, before joining the Union Canal towpath towards Edinburgh at the spectacular Falkirk Wheel.

Plan your journey along the canals with our route itineraries and day trips on the VisitScotland website.

National Route 755

Using the old Strathkelvin Railway Line, National Cycle Network Route 755 is a nearly fully traffic-free, family-friendly link between the Forth & Clyde Canal towpath at Kirkintilloch and the village of Strathblane.

The railway route, which closed in 1966, is now a tree and flower-lined path close to the Glazert Water and wanders through the peaceful Campsie Fells close to Milton of Campsie and Lennoxtown.

Plan your journey with our Strathkelvin Railway Path day trip PDF on the VisitScotland website.

National Route 756

National Cycle Network Route 756 is a well-used commuter route, running along traffic-free paths and some short, on-road sections from East Kilbride to Rutherglen in south-east Glasgow.

The route connects to National Cycle Network Routes 75 and 756, allowing good onward connections to Glasgow's centre and areas to the north and west of the city.

 

Please note

We have taken all responsible steps to ensure that these routes are safe and achievable by people with a reasonable level of fitness.

However, all outdoor activities involve a degree of risk.

To the extent permitted by law, Sustrans accepts no responsibility for any accidents or injury resulting from following these routes.

Walking and cycling routes change over time. Weather conditions may also affect path surfaces.

Please use your own judgement when using the routes based upon the weather and the ability, experience and confidence levels of those in your group.

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