London Quietways

London’s Quietways are a network of new cycle routes following quieter streets, parks and waterways opening across the capital. They are helping people who never thought they’d ride in London to make the switch to pedal power.

They are bringing so many benefits: keeping healthy and fit, reducing air pollution, improving neighbourhoods and making it easier to reach the places we want to go.

These quiet routes have encouraged people to take up riding their bikes, while experienced cyclists have described how much better their journeys are as a result of the new Quietways.

We’re proud to be helping to make Quietways happen, in our role as Transport for London’s delivery agent. 

Cyclists enjoying Quietways 1 route through south east London

Quietways are continuous routes following quieter streets, parks and waterways across inner and outer London. They overcome barriers to cycling by providing improved junctions and an alternative to riding on busy roads.

The Quietways are designed to TfL's London Cycling Design Standards, creating a network of routes enabling people to cycle to work, the shops or to meet their friends safely and comfortably.

Find out more about our role in Quietways

Cyclists on QUietway Route 1 between South Bermondsey Station and Millwall FC.

We’ve turned derelict railway sidings behind Millwall Football Club, regularly used as a rubbish dump, into a public square and a safe walking and cycling path that helps people to avoid busy roads.

The path forms part of Q1, the first London Quietway, linking Waterloo to Greenwich and opened to the public in 2016 after more than three years of effort.

The former derelict rail line by Millwall Stadium has been transformed into a 750-meter linear cycle lane

Zoe Spiliopoulou, Lead Urban Designer at Sustrans London, is the co-leader of the London Design Team and manages our urban realm schemes across London.

She was part of the team managing and designing the Millwall path scheme and explains how her own experiences as a cyclist shaped her design process.

Read her blog.

cyclist on quietway 1

“It’s a pleasure to cycle to work. The path cuts out some dangerous junctions and means you don’t need to cycle down the main road.”

“I’ve only been using this route for a few days. I’d been putting off cycling for years but I’ve just last week started cycling to work and find this route quick and straightforward. I’ve been quite surprised, I’m quite enjoying it.“

"This has taken me to places I have never been in London”, one rider said. “Quite an eye-opener”

Read more quotes about Quietway 1.

Quietways are accessible to everyone, whatever they ride

Inclusive Quietway design means everyone can enjoy the benefits of cycling.

We worked with Wheels for Wellbeing, an award-winning charity supporting disabled people of all abilities to enjoy the benefits of cycling, to ensure their needs were met.

In this blog post, Isabelle Clement, director of Wheels for Wellbeing puts Quietway 1 to the test.

When people think about what's involved in developing a new route they often think it is just about physical changes on the ground. The truth is that there can be months or even years of vital work behind the scenes before a shovel can be lifted.

We used our in-house planning and legal expertise to help resolve complex issues, working with many stakeholders and their legal representatives, including Network Rail, the London Boroughs of Lewisham and Southwark, Millwall Football Club and Millwall Community Trust.

cyclists on Valentines Park in Redbridge part of quietway 6

Sustrans has worked in partnership with Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure and Redbridge Borough Council to design and build the new cycling and walking bridge in Valentines Park, which has been funded by Transport for London.

Councillor John Howard, Cabinet Member for Environment and Sustainability said:"I’m delighted that Quietway 6 is now open for cyclists and pedestrians to use. It provides a greener and more modern transport network for Redbridge and will encourage more residents to cycle by providing a safer and easier route."

Cyclist

Steven Pleasant is the Chief Executive of Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council and the lead in the Combined Authority for Greater Manchester on Health and Wellbeing. 

"Over the next 20 years, there is a need to deliver continued sustainable economic growth, creating more jobs and new homes for the people of Greater Manchester. We need to work together to deliver infrastructure to manage growth sustainably and ensure the health and wellbeing of our communities".

Are you inspired by the success of Quietways? We can help you to identify and implement cost-effective, proven solutions that reduce car use and increase walking and cycling.