West Cumbria cycle bridges reopen after restoration

Metal bridge and bicycle

Before: The bridge prior to maintenance, Parkside

Metal bridge and bicycle

After: We worked on a metal bridge at Montreal Cottage, near Cleator Moor, after descaling and repainting

21 March 2018

Three bridges have reopened on popular cycle and walking routes between Whitehaven and Rowrah, as part of our work to restore the built and natural heritage of the former iron ore railways in the area.

Tracks of the Ironmasters project, which is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, will restore a total 41 historic bridges and structures along 16 miles of routes in West Cumbria, and develop a signed trail including stories from the local community.

We worked with specialists to repair and improve three bridges which serve the National Cycle Network routes around Cleator Moor in Copeland – part of the main cycle connection between Hadrian’s Cycleway and the Sea to Sea (C2C). The work included de-scaling and repainting the distinctive metal railway bridges at Montreal Cottage and at Parkside (across the busy A5086 Cockermouth – Egremont main road). The team also repainted the newer metal footbridge carrying the National Cycle Network route 72 at Blind Lane, as well as undertaking extensive timber replacement and maintenance work on the three bridges.

The bridges carrying the cycle path were each closed for three week intervals during the winter while works were completed.

Claire Kerrin, Sustrans Network Development Manager said:

“I’m delighted to say that the bridges at Montreal Cottages, Parkside and Blind Lane South are all now renovated and open for people on foot or by bike. These are very well-used sections of the path so we worked to a tight schedule to make sure the work was completed ahead of the Spring season. Two of the bridges were over 100 years old and are fascinating reminders of the foot and cycle path’s past history as an iron ore railway.”

The local team in West Cumbria will now work with volunteers to reseed grass verges with wildflowers and continue work to enhance wildlife habitats in the area. The tracks act as vital routes for wildlife as well as people and are home to rare species such as red squirrels, the small blue butterfly and nationally significant hay meadows.

Tracks of the Ironmasters routes are part of the long distance cycle route the Sea to Sea, a 140 mile challenge route which attracts over 15,000 people every year. We are carrying out bridge restoration work along 42 miles of the C2C.

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For more information, images and interviews please contact:
Sarah Roe, Marketing and Communications Officer (north),  T: 0161 233 4071 or M:07785 268 417