Sustrans celebrates approval for new Kingston to Merton walking and cycling link

artist's impression of new route

An impression of the 1.2km path.

1 June 2018

A new 1.2km walking and cycling path is approved by Royal Borough of Kingston-upon-Thames and London Borough of Merton. Funded by the Mayor of London, the work will also create a new linear park. Sustrans supported Kingston Go-Cycle team with project delivery.

The ‘New Malden to Raynes Park Link’ connecting Kingston-upon-Thames with Merton, cleared one of the final hurdles when it was unanimously approved by Kingston Development Committee in April 2018 and then given the green light by Merton Council.

We are  delighted to be working on this complex, multi-partner project with Kingston Council, Merton Council, Thames Water and Transport for London. Sustrans has been supporting many aspect of the project delivery since carrying out the initial feasibility study in 2015

Our team, including everyone involved in the design, community engagement and the ecologists is proud to have helped the Kingston Go-Cycle team to overcome the hurdles to help make it easier for people to walk and cycle safely.

- Matt Winfield, London Director for Sustrans

Sustrans also delivered the engagement, stakeholder management, design, ecology, partner negotiations and public consultation for the scheme, which demonstrates the benefits that can be delivered through a collaborative design approach and vision.

The new 1.2km walking and cycling link will open up an entirely traffic-free path between New Malden Railway Station and Raynes Park Recreation Ground, where it will connect to new routes to Raynes Park and Wimbledon as part of Transport for London’s new Quietways network.

The path will run parallel to the railway line on land owned by Thames Water and will pass under the A3 Kingston bypass, avoiding busy and lengthy alternative routes and improving journey times between these areas for people walking and cycling.

As well as providing a new active travel link, the project will also create a new linear park, providing a space to access and enjoy the environment and wildlife in the area, with the local ecology and biodiversity being important considerations in the design of this project.

The new path is part of Kingston Council’s £34.7million “mini-Holland” Go Cycle Scheme, funded by the Mayor of London.

Matt Winfield, London Director for Sustrans said:

“We are thrilled to see the new path come one step closer to reality. Often the hardest work in getting a new route built is the years of behind the scenes effort; feasibility studies, working with the community on the right solution, public consultations, designs, planning applications and committee meetings. Our team, including everyone involved in the design, community engagement and the ecologists is proud to have helped the Kingston Go-Cycle team to overcome those hurdles to make it easier for people to walk and cycle.”

Merton Cycling Campaign commented:

“Cyclists and Pedestrians can only welcome this worthwhile scheme. For cycling, it provides a valuable link to the improving cycling facilities of Kingston and gives Merton the opportunity to attract cycle traffic from Kingston, not only commuters but also shoppers and leisure cyclists.”

Kingston Councillor Hilary Gander was pleased that the project was going ahead and said:

"The decision by Merton Council to grant planning permission is welcomed and is an important next step".

Merton Councillor Nick Draper said it was a "massive boom" for the community. "This new route will be so much safer and easier than the current way".