Community Links PLUS final five

A visualisation of how Burnbrae roundabout may look if funded (image courtesy of East Dunbartonshire Council)

Community Links PLUS shortlisted project: Burnbrae: Making the Connection (image courtesy of East Dunbartonshire Council)

A visualisation of how Gorbals Road, outside the Citizens Theatre, may look if this project is funded (image courtesy of Glasgow City Council)

Community Links PLUS shortlisted project: Victoria Road, Glasgow (image courtesy of Glasgow City Council)

A visualisation of how part of the City Centre to West Edinburgh urban cycling corridor may look if funded (image courtesy of City of Edinburgh Council)

Community Links PLUS shortlisted project: City Centre to West Edinburgh urban cycling corridor (image courtesy of City of Edinburgh Council)

A visualisation of how the Woodlands Mini Holland may look if funded (image courtesy of Glasgow City Council)

Community Links PLUS shortlisted project: Woodside Mini-Holland (image courtesy of Glasgow City Council)

A cycle counter in Inverness being passed by a cyclist

Community Links PLUS shortlisted project: The Inverness City Active Travel Network (image courtesy of Highland Council)

8 February 2016

Five cycling and walking proposals from across Scotland have reached the final stage of the unique Community Links PLUS design competition, run by Sustrans Scotland and the Scottish Government.

Community Links PLUS attracted 25 applications from 24 Local Authorities across Scotland. The entries, initially narrowed down to 10 pioneering projects, sought to re-balance Scotland’s streets making walking, cycling and pedestrian access for all ages and abilities safer, easier and healthier.

The five projects selected to progress to Stage Three of the competition are:

A cross-sectoral panel, made up of Neil Langhorn and Karen Furey from Transport Scotland, Stuart Watson from the Scottish Government, John Howie from NHS Health Scotland, Keith Irving from Cycling Scotland, Stuart Hay from Living Streets, Colin Howden from Transform Scotland, and Ian Findlay from Paths for All, examined the short-list of 10 projects making it to Stage Two, whittling them down to five projects from four local authorities.

What were the key criteria?

They bode well for the future of Scotland.

- John Lauder

Key criteria for the projects included robust community engagement plans, high standards of design quality and innovation, deliverability, and partnership work.
 
Crucially, the Community Links PLUS projects will deliver segregated, on-road cycle paths and facilitate improvements to our public realm to help people of all ages and abilities to explore without a car and to make 10% of everyday trips by bike by 2020.
 
John Lauder, National Director of Sustrans Scotland, said: 
 
“We are absolutely delighted with the extremely high quality of entries to the Community Links PLUS design competition. These proposals are exemplary in their understanding of the need to improve our streets for the well-being of everyone.
 
"They bode well for the future of Scotland. The Scottish Government, and in particular, Derek Mackay MSP, the Minister for Transport and Islands, has demonstrated real vision in supporting this competition.
 
"Critically, all local authorities across Scotland have shown they are keen to enable access for pedestrians and cyclists of all abilities. The country is embracing the health and economic benefits of a modal shift in how we design our streets and roads."

Find out more about Community Links PLUS and the shortlisted projects.

Read about our innovative community street design work.