Browse routes

With hundreds of routes to choose from, the National Cycle Network is a great way to discover the UK. 

  • From the hustle and bustle of town life in Caerphilly, this route transports you to tranquil green fields and blue bell-carpeted woods with protected wildlife sites.

  • This route is perfect for novices and young children.  Traffic free and short, it offers lovely views out over to Mumbles Head. 

  • This route travels between Port Talbot and the gorgeous Afan Forest.  The area is a haven for all sorts of wonderful wildlife and has world-class mountain bike trails.

  • The Aire Valley Towpath route provides a wonderful opportunity to explore part of the longest canal in Britain.

  • The Alban Way is a trail for cyclists and walkers along the former route of the Hatfield to St Albans branch line of the Great Northern Railway.

  • After following quiet roads from Balerno to East Calder, the highlight of this 14 mile route between Balerno and Bathgate is the Almondell and Calderwood Country Park where you can cycle right through the park between East Calder and Mid Calder and under the impressive railway viaduct. From Mid Calder and through Livingstone, where you can visit the Almond Valley Heritage Trust, you continue towards Bathgate on a mainly traffic-free route.

  • This route is an easy-to-follow ride or walk along a raised Greenway from the docklands at Beckton right to the heart of Stratford, meaning that anyone heading along this route can easily avoid the traffic.

  • Take time to enjoy the slower pace of life along this green corridor through the city

  • This great ride along the Fylde Coast takes you from Blackpool to Fleetwood using traffic free promenades.
     
    Please Note: Closures on route, see below

  • An easy cycle from Bowling to Dumbarton and on to Balloch at the south side of Loch Lomond.

  • Connecting the two towns via a high quality traffic-free path through the countryside, the Brampton Valley Way provides the perfect opportunity for a family day out.

  • Those with an aversion to hills will love this flat route which follows the Caledonian Canal from the head of Loch Oich to Fort Augustus. This is a short section of the very much longer Caledonia Way (National Route 78).

  • The immensely popular Bristol and Bath Railway Path provides a tranquil walking and cycling path between the two cities.

  • The Brunel Trail is a popular shared-use path linking Neyland, once the western terminus of Brunel's Great Western Railway, with Johnston and Haverfordwest. The trail begins at Neyland Marina and follows the picturesque Cleddau estuary through Westfield Pill Nature Reserve before continuing along the now disused Great Western Railway line to Johnston.

  • Follow National Route 5 from Shotton across the River Dee to pick up National Route 568 at Hawarden Bridge and then leave the railway path and pick your way through the Deeside Industrial Park as you head north.
    Please Note: Route closed between Hawarden Bridge and the Blue Bridge/Welsh Road from mid November for up to 8 months for flood bank stabilisation works. A diversion will be signed. Please take care on this diversion and follow all signs.

  • One of the most popular recreational routes in the country, the Camel Trail runs from Padstow to Wenford Bridge, via Wadebridge and Bodmin. The trail passes through the wooded countryside of the upper Camel Valley and alongside the picturesque Camel Estuary - a paradise for birdwatchers.

  • Linking the former ironworks at Tondu and Bedford Park, this route passes through the Parc Slip Nature Park which is home to a wealth of wildlife including rare wading birds and many species of butterfly, damselfly and dragonfly.

  • This route connects the historic city of Chester to the Wharf at Connah's Quay. The path takes you along an old railway line and is an attractive open ride from the north side of Chester out into the Wirral’s rich arable farmlands.

  • These scenic clay trails first opened in March 2005 and enable visitors to enjoy this unique area of Cornwall created by the clay mining industry.

  • The route travels between Llanfoist, just to the south of Abergavenny, and Brynmawr, passing high above the Clydach Gorge.

  • Following discussions between Sustrans and British Waterways, the canal towpath between Clydebank and Edinburgh is now officially part of the National Cycle Network with adopted number National Route 754. The towpaths of the Forth and Clyde Canal and the Union Canal form a reasonably direct, almost flat and completely traffic free route between Scotland's two great cities.

  • A tranquil green corridor all the way from Comber to the heart of East Belfast along the old Belfast to Comber railway line.

  • Much of the route follows the line of the former Stanhope & Tyne Railway, Britain’s first commercial railway, which was finally closed in 1985. The route into Sunderland takes you past the new Stadium of Light, along the riverside, through the marina and onto the beach at Roker.

  • Coventry Canal towpath forms a hidden green corridor through the city which is useful for commuting and ideal for family cycling, or for anyone wanting to escape the city without really having to leave.

  • The Cuckoo Trail is one of the most popular family cycle rides in the South East and gained its name from an old Sussex tradition of releasing a cuckoo at the Heathfield Fair.

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